Items filtered by date: June 2016

running injuriesAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “a minimum of two and a half hours of moderate-intensity aerobic activity,” such as running or jogging, is recommended each week. However, in order to sufficiently prevent running injuries, make sure to wear shoes that have proper support as well as pace your running routine. If you have any current health or foot conditions, see your doctor first to determine your exercise schedule. It is recommended to start first with both walking and running until a continuous running time of 20 minutes can be reached.

Running injuries, even with proper precautions, can still occur in many runners. If you are suffering from a running injury, consult with Dr. Sean Sider, D.P.M. of Foot Centers of Maryland. Dr. Sider will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber, this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices in Baltimore and Reisterstown, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about How to Prevent Running Injuries

Published in Blog

corns2While many women enjoy wearing high heels, to promote better foot health women should instead opt to wear them for special occasions. Heels lead to long-term problems for our bodies, especially for the spine, joints, ankles, knees, and feet. Foot conditions such as Morton’s neuroma, bunions, and hammertoes can result from continuous high heel wear. High heels essentially alter our body’s structure and gait. If you don’t want to avoid high heel wear altogether, opt for wearing high heels on days that do not require long periods of standing or walking.

High heels can create a myriad of foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet consult with Dr. Sean Sider, D.P.M. of Foot Centers of Maryland. Dr. Sider will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because they are associated with femininity. Despite their appeal, they can cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

What parts my body will be affected by high heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – may shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – they decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain. Also, the vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What kinds of foot problems can develop from wearing high heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How can I still wear high heels and maintain foot health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems. Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet. Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising. If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work. Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock; you can buy either full inserts or metatarsal pads.

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices in Baltimore and Reisterstown, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about the effects of high heels.

Published in Blog

biomechanics9The walking gait cycle, as it’s known, “refers to our natural ability to propel ourselves forward.” According to physiotherapist Galen Carroll, “the technique we use when we walk can stress the joints, ligaments, tendons and muscles of the body in different ways,” so it’s important for our foot gait to be stable and anatomically correct. A natural gait involves the heel striking the ground, with our knees and hips aligned. In ensuring our feet’s overall health, opt for comfortable footwear that offers proper support for our feet.

The biomechanics are the moving parts that manage the movement of your feet. If you would like more information, consult with Dr. Sean Sider, D.P.M. of Foot Centers of Maryland. Dr. Sider will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics
- Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
- In 1974 biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination to the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices in Baltimore and Reisterstown, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Biomechanics of Podiatry

Published in Blog

plantar fasciitis6Plantar fasciitis is currently one of the most common causes of heel pain, and it can cause noticeable pain when you first get up during the mornings. The condition typically affects people who are aged 30 to 60, “caused by micro tears or inflammation in the band of tissues on the bottom of your foot that are attached to your heel bone.” Heel pain from plantar fasciitis often gets worse throughout the day, so it’s important to see a podiatrist immediately. Treating your plantar fasciitis condition involves stretching your foot muscles, using anti-inflammatory medications, and icing your heels at night. Foot inserts or custom orthotics can also help alleviate any pain associated with the condition.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, consult with Dr. Sean Sider, D.P.M. of Foot Centers of Maryland. Dr. Sider will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

·     Excessive running

·     Non-supportive shoes

·     Overpronation

·     Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

·     Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices

·     Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis

·     Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices in Baltimore and Reisterstown, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis

Published in Blog
© 2013 Foot Centers of Maryland Site map